Is it true that our solar system has 397 planets?

Strictly speaking, the solar system has only eight planets—possibly nine, if the existence of Planet Nine is proven.The planets are, in order of distance from the Sun:

  1. Mercury — Aphel 0.47 AE / Perihelion 0.31 AE
  2. Venus — Aphel 0.73 AE / Perihelion 0.72 AE
  3. Earth — Aphel 1.01 AU / Perihelion 0.98 AU
  4. Mars — Aphel 1.67 AE / Perihelion 1.38 AE
  5. Jupiter — Aphel 5.45 AU / Perihelion 4.95 AU
  6. Saturn — Aphel 10.09 AU / Perihelion 9.02 AU
  7. Uranus — Aphel 20.11 AE / Perihelion 18.33 AE
  8. Neptune — Aphel 30.33 AU / Perihelion 29.81 AU
  9. Planet Nine (hypothetical) — Aphel 1,200 AE / Perihelion 200 AE

In principle, there is nothing that clearly distinguishes a dwarf planet from a planet, and the boundary between that; the distinction between planet and dwarf planet is not complete, and arbitrary.In addition, the name of an astronomical object that can be counted as a planet or dwarf planet is partly dependent on the position and distance from the sun.

For example, if the Earth were at the Pluto site, the Earth would not be named according to the third criterion of a planet according to the International Astronomical Union (dominates the orbit, and has cleared other objects in the same orbit), and would thus be considered Dwarf planet.

So, the known planets and dwarf planets are ordered by the Sun:

  1. Mercury — Aphel 0.47 AE / Perihelion 0.31 AE
  2. Venus — Aphel 0.73 AE / Perihelion 0.72 AE
  3. Earth — Aphel 1.01 AU / Perihelion 0.98 AU
  4. Mars — Aphel 1.67 AE / Perihelion 1.38 AE
  5. Ceres (Dwarf Planet) — Aphel 2.98 AU / Perihelion 2.56 AU
  6. Jupiter — Aphel 5.45 AU / Perihelion 4.95 AU
  7. Saturn — Aphel 10.09 AU / Perihelion 9.02 AU
  8. Uranus — Aphel 20.11 AE / Perihelion 18.33 AE
  9. Neptune — Aphel 30.33 AU / Perihelion 29.81 AU
  10. Pluto (Dwarf Planet) — Aphel 49.31 AU / Perihelion 29.66 AU
  11. Orcus (possibly a dwarf planet) — Aphel 48.07 AE / Perihelion 30.87 AE
  12. 2007 OR10 (almost certainly a dwarf planet) — Aphel 100.93 AU / Perihelion 33.05 AU
  13. Haumea (Dwarf Planet) — Aphel 51.48 AU / Perihelion 34.95 AU
  14. 2002 MS4 (possibly a dwarf planet) — Aphel 47.74 AU / Perihelion 35.69 AU
  15. Salacia (almost certainly a dwarf planet) — Aphel 46.43 AE / Perihelion 37.30 AE
  16. Eris (Dwarf Planet) — Aphel 97.65 AU / Perihelion 37.91 AU
  17. Makemake (Dwarf Planet) — Aphel 52.84 AU / Perihelion 38.59 AU
  18. Varuna (probably a dwarf planet) — Aphel 45.30 AU / Perihelion 40.95 AU
  19. Quaoar (probably a dwarf planet) — Aphel 44.88 AE / Perihelion 41.87 AE
  20. 2014 UZ224 (probably a dwarf planet) — Aphel 179.8 AU / Perihelion 37.97 AU
  21. 2012 VP113 (probably a dwarf planet) — Aphel 438 AE / Perihelion 80.5 EE
  22. 2004 VN112 (possibly a dwarf planet) — Aphel 583.305 AU / Perihelion 47,295 AU
  23. 2010 GB178 (possibly a dwarf planet) — Aphel 691,339 AU / Perihelion 48,061 AU
  24. 2007 TG422 (possibly a dwarf planet) — Aphel 917.3 AU / perihelion 35.6 AU
  25. Sedna (almost certainly a dwarf planet) — Aphel 936 AU / Perihelion 76.09 AU
  26. Planet Nine (hypothetical) — Aphel 1,200 AE / Perihelion 200 AE
  27. 2014 FE72 (possibly a dwarf planet) — Aphel approx. 3829 AU / Perihelion 36.36 AU

Nevertheless, as far as is known, the solar system does not count any 397 planets or dwarf planets.However, scientists believe there are more than 100 dwarf planets there. [1 Note, however, that the IAE has designated all dwarf planets beyond Plutoids.

Footnotes

[1 https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/pla…

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