Does vegetarianism have any advantage on the environment?

I am not a vegetarian myself.

But vegetarianism does not have ‘ any ‘ advantage for HT environment, but even very big impact, for the most part positive.

First of all, you may have heard something about the ‘ manure surplus ‘.A major cause of this is the meat industry… And it exists because people like me occasionally want to eat meat. There are even people who do this daily.

Then there is something very idioots… To feed these animals, we cultivate plant food, which we give to those animals.And to get one kilo of proteins from meat, we have to stop ten kilos of vegetable proteins in those beasts. Either, we could have been able to grow one-tenth of the food if we had eaten it directly, rather than through that cow or that pig.

All that food is transported back and forth… And that transport also repels CO2 again…

In short, eating meat clearly has a negative impact on the environment.Not eating meat, provided enough people do it, not.

CO2 emissions are reduced when consuming less meat/poultry.

  • Less agricultural land is needed to feed the animals

A somewhat older report from 2006 of the United Nations is the best source I could find here quickly.

Environmental issues and options

Little.It turns out that the meat-free citizens are not as omworld friendly at all.

The question has been put wrong… It must be ‘ how much advantage it has… ‘…
Also, I would go one step further and replace vegetarianism in demand by veganism… Why?Vegetarians still eat dairy products and eggs, where the production of the first is still a very high ecological footprint…
In the production of animal (nutritional) products, the following issues have a huge impact on the environment (which is therefore a matter of vegetable dietary choice, which is vegetarianism):
-90% to more of the international soya cultivation goes to livestock for use in animal feed.For this, a lot of rainforest is deforest. Of the other percentage is the lion’s share for industrial applications and a smaller amount for direct human use as a foodstuff. Most of the European soy for human food is grown in Europe itself and also in Canada. Most of the soy for fodder originates from South America…
-Just make the sum of pasture (where the animals are not even crazy long in their short life) + Stables + arable crops only for fodder (winter food as fodder beet, corn,…) and consider how many plants you could grow to To give the human right.You would need much less of the soil and the surplus (the less teable part) would you eg. Can let you back…
-Those who eat animal products indirectly consume more water > needed during the growth of the fodder + the amount of fodder the animal needs to be slaughtered, + the water that it drinks… Directly plant-based food turns that between step and thus saves much more water than all socially saving measures as ecological showering, power saver of the crane,… Actually, you save a multitude of them…
-The water used to grow part of our fodder elsewhere is lost for local use for more regional and sustainable crops.Locally, the water is used one-sided for monocultures, to the detriment of local self-sustaining agriculture and the environment…
-There are already more farmed animals in agriculture than there are in the wild, because of the relentous human consumption and the possibility of growing the animals (in unworthy conditions) en masse on clay surfaces per animal… Thus, an imbalance of many animals of only a few (domesticated) species is obtained against much less animals per species of wild animals.A disruption in biodiversity…
-All those cows that are used in both the dairy and the meat industry (and these are not the same species, although dairy cows are also slaughtered after a 6 years of exploitation) produce a lot of methane gas… A whole bunch of…
-All farm animals together also generate a whole bunch of manure, so much (too much) that we are talking about a manure surplus (next to the Meat Mountain, the milk Pond and the Boterberg)… This manure has to go somewhere and the arable crops are being overfertilised.In eg. The USA has large basins in areas with mega cattle farms to dump the manure. The effects on the environment can be imagined. Also, a lot of manure is just dumped in rivers and sea, one of the causes of the meanwhile known ocean Deadzones…

So a plant-based eating method has a much smaller ecological footprint and if you really want to reduce it then you can become even better vegan instead of vegetarian… Whoever wants to throw a lot of plant products with the boat or the airplane should also come here > these are usually products that people with an omnifor diet also eat, but suddenly take offense when vegans eat this too… It is not specially introduced for the plants…

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